Bull Connor represents—and even in the story of sundown towns—a kind of exceptionalism in this country’s history where we can distance ourselves from this kind of rabid, racist personification of the past that distances ourselves from what is with us today. And so making the connection to the systematic microaggressions—just the simple abuse of authority and disrespect that happens every single day—what happened to Michael Brown, just like what happened to Eric Garner, is just the most extreme form of this. So when you hear people in Ferguson talking about how police harassment is a way of life in this community—and in other communities all around it—that’s what has to be the frontier. Because that’s the story of Black people in America. In the South it was vigilantism. In the North, it has always been police violence. And if we don’t make that connection, if we don’t say that history is actually fairly flat in this instance, then we have not moved the needle in nearly 100 years when it comes to Black people making claims on liberty.
Apparently it takes the death of more than one unarmed teen to get an arrest, I’m wondering how many stores it takes to be looted before one loses their after-dark First Amendment rights to assembly.
I want to mourn the deaths of Mike Brown and Eric Garner and Trayvon Martin, and I want to question why the deaths of Renisha McBride and Islan Nettles and Kathryn Johnston haven’t gotten similar traction. Why the beating of Marlene Pinnock isn’t on all of our lips. Why the nation is not familiar with the names of Stephanie Maldonado, or of Ersula Ore. And how many women’s names do we not know because they don’t dare come forward? Because the violence they experience at the hands of the police is sexual, and the shame and stigma around sexual violence silences them?
You realize that everything the police are doing in Ferguson is carefully calculated, right? They’re purposely turning peaceful protests into riots. They’re purposely committing violence to incite violence. From saying ‘We won’t be answering 911 calls,’ which is a very clever way to set themselves up to be able to say, ‘We were afraid for our safety - any call could really be an ambush, our lives were in danger’ right down to the camouflage and the military tanks and wearing more body armor than a soldier in a war zone. Its exactly why they’re going for a media blackout - yet allowing certain photos through - they WANT you to see their tanks. They want you to see their riot gear. They WANT you to see a war-zone. They’re trying to sell the world the idea that this community is inherently and constantly a source of violence and turmoil - they want you to think that they [the police] are being attacked daily in a place so vicious they need full body armor. You know why? Because then, at the end of the day, you might just be able to believe the story they’re going to spin. They’re going to tell you that this (white) officer goes to work in this war zone every day - that he spends every working moment in constant fear for his life. They’re going to tell you that Michael Brown attacked this officer. And then they’re going to bring up everything that has happened in the aftermath and try to use it to convince you that he shot that little boy because he was afraid for his life. They’re setting up a defense. You mark my words, they’re trying to set up a defense.
maarnayeri:

White teens who kill receive kind words and humanizing obituary-esque headlines surrounding their crimes, whereas black teens who are killed are covertly demonized or belittled and no worth is attached to the stories covering their death.
This is the world we live in.

maarnayeri:

White teens who kill receive kind words and humanizing obituary-esque headlines surrounding their crimes, whereas black teens who are killed are covertly demonized or belittled and no worth is attached to the stories covering their death.

This is the world we live in.

(via mangocupcakes)

Some problems we share as women, some we do not. You fear

your children will grow up to join the patriarchy and testify

against you, we fear our children will be dragged from a car and

shot down in the street, and you will turn your backs upon the

reasons they are dying.

"My response to the “I am not a feminist” internet phenomenon….

First of all, it’s clear you don’t know what feminism is. But I’m not going to explain it to you. You can google it. To quote an old friend, “I’m not the feminist babysitter.”

But here is what I think you should know.

You’re insulting every woman who was forcibly restrained in a jail cell with a feeding tube down her throat for your right to vote, less than 100 years ago.

You’re degrading every woman who has accessed a rape crisis center, which wouldn’t exist without the feminist movement.

You’re undermining every woman who fought to make marital rape a crime (it was legal until 1993).

You’re spitting on the legacy of every woman who fought for women to be allowed to own property (1848). For the abolition of slavery and the rise of the labor union. For the right to divorce. For women to be allowed to have access to birth control (Comstock laws). For middle and upper class women to be allowed to work outside the home (poor women have always worked outside the home). To make domestic violence a crime in the US (It is very much legal in many parts of the world). To make workplace sexual harassment a crime.

In short, you know not what you speak of. You reap the rewards of these women’s sacrifices every day of your life. When you grin with your cutsey sign about how you’re not a feminist, you ignorantly spit on the sacred struggle of the past 200 years. You bite the hand that has fed you freedom, safety, and a voice.

In short, kiss my ass, you ignorant little jerks.”

29.
Veronica Mars | Rob Thomas, 2014

29.

Veronica Mars | Rob Thomas, 2014

42.
A League of Their Own | Penny Marshall, 1992

42.

A League of Their Own | Penny Marshall, 1992

41.
The Devil Wears Prada | David Frankel, 2006

41.

The Devil Wears Prada | David Frankel, 2006

40.
Star Trek Into the Darkness | J.J. Abrams, 2013

40.

Star Trek Into the Darkness | J.J. Abrams, 2013

we're screw-ups. I'm a screw-up and I plan to be a screw-up until my late 20s, maybe even my early 30s.

25-year-old east coast women's college graduate with a laptop and no original thoughts.

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spending all day every day watching movies and television.